PharmD Info

A forum for Indian Pharmacy Professionals

Important: Registered today to have the complete access on this forum --- Register Here
Its an inter-professional and collaborative learning platform for the doctors and other healthcare professionals to discuss on various healthcare issues and views with pharmacy professionals. Pharmacist also can assist and share your ideas for the better therapeutic outcomes based on clear evidence. E.g: Drug Information, Decision Analysis and EBM.
Forum rules: The contents of the pharmdinfo.com, such as text, graphics, images, and other material contained on the pharmdinfo.com Site ("Content") are for informational purposes only. The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on the Pharmdinfo.com Site!

If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 108 immediately. pharmdinfo.com does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physicians, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned on the Site
  • User avatar
#239
Oats are often touted for lowering bad cholesterol, improving the immune system, lowering blood pressure and, more recently, being gluten-free, but a new study finds that some oat-based breakfast cereals in the U.S. contain a mold-related toxin called ochratoxin A (OTA) that's been linked to kidney cancer in animal studies.

Natural or not, they may need closer monitoring for potential mold contamination, warns a paper in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Dojin Ryu and Hyun Jung Lee note that ochratoxin A is one of the most common toxic products released by molds in the world. Previous studies have found the toxin in samples of pork, dried fruits, wine, coffee and other products. Scientists don't yet know how the toxin affects human health, but the International Agency for Research on Cancer, which is part of the World Health Organization, classifies it as a possible human carcinogen.

Animals exposed to ochratoxin A in experiments developed kidney tumors and although the U.S. doesn't currently regulate the contaminant, the European Union has set maximum limits for ochratoxin A in food. Ryu and Lee wanted to see how U.S. breakfast cereals -- a staple in many Americans' diets -- measured up to that standard.

The researchers tested close to 500 samples of corn-, rice-, wheat- and oat-based breakfast cereals purchased from U.S. stores over two years. They found that in most samples, OTA levels were lower than the European threshold. But concentrations exceeded the EU standard in 8 percent of oat-based breakfast cereal samples.

The researchers conclude that oat production, storage and processing need careful review to better protect consumer health.
Similar Topics
Topics Statistics Last post
Can a Indian Pharm D be called Doctor?
by Admin  - 07 May 2017, 17:25  - In: Pharmacy Education
0 Replies 
2588 Views
by Admin
07 May 2017, 17:25
0 Replies 
349 Views
by rahmatulla.syed
18 Feb 2018, 00:09
0 Replies 
790 Views
by Admin
28 Aug 2017, 14:38
0 Replies 
850 Views
by Mahalakshmi
10 Nov 2017, 12:24
0 Replies 
695 Views
by Krishna K
20 Jun 2018, 22:05

Tags

In this infographic, they have displayed the even[…]

Hello Everyone

This is the best thing i do today to be a member i[…]

https://i.imgur.com/WzzIkLJ.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/xUyNEY4.jpg

WELCOME TO OUR E-LEARN COURSE WORK MODULES