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Expected life years (ELY) is the average number of years an individual is expected to live, based on their age and other relevant factors. The calculation of expected life years is based on life expectancy tables, which provide the average remaining life expectancy for people of different ages and genders.

Life expectancy tables are typically compiled by national statistical agencies or other organizations, based on data from mortality rates and population demographics. These tables can be used to estimate how long an individual is likely to live based on their current age, gender, and other factors such as health status, lifestyle habits, and family history.

Here are the steps to calculate expected life years:

Determine the age of the individual or the age range you are interested in. For example, if you are interested in calculating the expected life years for a 60-year-old individual, you would use the life expectancy for someone who is 60 years old.

Look up the life expectancy for that age or age range in a life expectancy table. Life expectancy tables can be found online or in publications such as the World Health Organization's Global Health Observatory. For example, the life expectancy for a 60-year-old man in the United States is 20.6 years, according to the National Center for Health Statistics.

Multiply the remaining life expectancy by the number of years expected to live. For example, if the remaining life expectancy is 20.6 years, and you expect to live for another 5 years, the expected life years would be 20.6 x 5 = 103 years.

Adjust the life expectancy based on any relevant factors. This can be done by using actuarial data or risk tables that provide adjustments to life expectancy based on these factors. For example, if the individual has a chronic health condition that is likely to shorten their life expectancy, this factor could be taken into account to adjust the expected life years calculation.

It's important to note that expected life years are based on statistical averages and are not a guarantee of how long an individual will actually live. There are many factors that can impact life expectancy, including genetics, lifestyle habits, and environmental factors.

Here's an example to illustrate the calculation of expected life years:

Let's say you are a 50-year-old woman and you want to calculate your expected life years. According to the life expectancy tables, the average remaining life expectancy for a 50-year-old woman in the United States is 31.4 years.

If you expect to live for another 30 years, you would multiply 31.4 by 30, which equals 942 expected life years. However, this calculation does not take into account any relevant factors that could impact your life expectancy, such as family history, lifestyle habits, or health status.

To adjust for these factors, you could consult an actuary or use risk tables that provide adjustments to life expectancy based on these factors. For example, if you have a family history of a specific disease, this could be taken into account to adjust the expected life years calculation.

Overall, expected life years can be a useful tool for planning and making decisions that impact long-term goals, such as retirement planning or estate planning. However, it's important to keep in mind that this calculation is based on statistical averages and is not a guarantee of how long an individual will actually live.

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